ABOUT ME



Dec 28




 

I leaned over Jean Luc’s shoulder reading his work. The subject is the shoulder in. He put his hand on my hand saying, "I have the feeling that you are going to use this part before I finish this study.” I say yep, placed my free hand on the mouse and clicked copy. Here it is:

Maya Angelou wrote, "I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” This applies to horses. You win their heart when you make them comfortable with their body and sound. You have a very special place in their mind when you encourage them to think and respect their errors. They never forgot when you treat them as partners. You can win their stomach with carrots, sugar, or any other treat but you don’t win their respect. It would ...


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Dec 14

 Jean Luc COrnille

  posted by helyn on 14.12.14 12:56 as Yes, winning is not everything.




The SOM (Science of Motion) was initially developed for better performances in the show ring. It was about educating and coordinating the horses' physique for the athletic demands of the performances, Once in the show ring, and in order to win, it was still necessary to show what the judges wanted to see, but it was possible to greatly reduce the percentage of injuries that is epidemic in the show ring. Also, the horses showed better gaits. Once a judge asked me, Where do you find these million dollars movers?" I told him, "I make them." He laugh thinking that I was joking and say, "Good response." I did not have a sponsor and I could not afford the purchase of extraordinary movers but with appropriated education, the horse’s gaits improved dramatically. Look at the horse that could not trot.(A video SOM produced) He was dead lame and totally crippled. At ...
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Sep 17

 Equine

  posted by helyn on 17.09.14 11:26 as Equine Science



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In academic education as well as in academic equitation, there are three types of learners, superficial learners, strategic learners and deep learners. Superficial learners are satisfied with training techniques moving the horse side way holding the reins and touching the limbs with a whip or a bamboo pole. They only consider the gesture without any understanding and even concern for the athletic demand that the gesture imposes on the horse’s physique. Superficial learners don’t question how the horse does it. Superficial learners accept leg-yielding as a rational movement. They are not concerned with the fact that leg-yielding induces inverted rotation of the thoracic spine. As long as the horse moves side way, superficial learners believe that they are doing dressage. Superficial learners regard shoulder for as a small shoulder in.

 

Strategic learners further their knowledge but mostly to pass the exam or satisfy the judging standards. Most riders ...


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Dec 8

 Conversations from our IHTC

  posted by helyn on 08.12.13 14:47 as General




Discussion on our IHTC group-about the DVD "The Horse That Could Not Trot". Jean Luc Cornille and Stacy Wilson.
Stacy Wilson: The horse that could not trot was so educational on a lot of levels. Don't want to spoil it for those that have not seen it yet, but have to wonder how many horses are labeled lame, lazy or bad behavior when in fact many times it is none of those things. I was so fascinated at how I could see more and more what was going on as the video progressed and the root cause was slowly revealed. 

The ending was simply incredible.

JLC, what is your outlook when you encounter these unusual cases, did you have doubts back then if the horse could be re-educated? I loved the way that you never punish the horse, but seem to just take it all in to try ...

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Dec 8

 Lightness

  posted by helyn on 08.12.13 14:45 as General




"Lightness is not the bit; lightness is the outcome of an athletic development and a coordination of the horse physique allowing superior body control. Lightness involves the legs, the seat, the hands and above all, the brain.”
Jean Luc Cornille

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